Demand for rhino horn in Vietnam threatens rhinos | WWF

Demand for rhino horn in Vietnam threatens rhinos

Adult and calf white rhino. rel=
Adult and calf white rhino.
© WWF / Martin HARVEY
The survival of the rhino is hanging by a thread.

Increasing demand for rhino horn from Asia, and especially Vietnam, is driving a poaching crisis on the African continent with poaching levels in South Africa having risen by a staggering 5000% since 2007.

In 2012, 668 rhinos were illegally killed in South Africa equal to an average of almost two rhinos killed per day. Poaching levels have risen by a staggering 5000% since 2007 when just 13 rhinos were killed.

Although there are laws already in place to protect the rhino, as well as other endangered species, governments are not doing enough.

WWF and TRAFFIC, along with you, our supporters, are asking governments to protect rhinos from poaching by:

• increasing law enforcement
• imposing strict deterrents
• reducing demand for rhino horn


Join us on Facebook and SAY NO to rhino horn.


Why are we campaigning in Vietnam?

  • 668 rhinos were illegally killed in South Africa in 2012.
  • Vietnam is the main market for rhino horn with new evidence showing growing numbers of consumers using it for non-traditional purposes such as to treat a hangover and to demonstrate wealth.
  • The world cannot afford to lose this magnificent creature.
  • Governments have the power to stop it; WWF and TRAFFIC want to help them.

We really have to fight for them. If they don't have champions they are doomed to dissapear.

Jacques Flamand / WWF-South Africa

INFOGRAPHIC

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	© © WWF
    The WWF Wildlife Crime Scorecard report selects 23 range, transit and consumer countries from Asia and Africa facing the highest levels of illegal trade in elephant ivory, rhino horn and tiger parts

MEDIA CONTACT

  • Nguyen Thuy Quynh (Ms.)
    Manager, Communications Department
    WWF-Vietnam
    D13 Thang Long, 
    International Village, 
    Hanoi

    +84 4 37193049
    quynh.nguyenthuy@wwfgreatermekong.org
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